– A good target number during exercise is your target heart rate or a certain percentage of your maximum heart rate. During moderate-intensity activity, the AHA says your target heart rate should be 50-70% of your maximum heart rate, while during vigorous physical activity it should be 70-85% of your maximum heart rate.

Your heart rate is probably not something you often consider unless you push it fast during exercise or observe it after a health problem, but believe me, it can tell you a lot about your health. However, you need to know that it is not the same for everyone and it varies depending on what you are doing.

For example, your resting heart rate while exercising will be much lower than your “target” heart rate. Many other factors affect the “reading” of your heartbeat, such as age and genetics.

It usually stays between 60 and 100 at rest

– As a rule, your resting heart rate should be between 60 and 100 when doing normal activities that are not related to exercise – says Dr. Assistant Professor of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Rubanti Titano.

This, he points out, is a huge range, but for good reason.

– Numerous factors affect the heartbeat. For example, genetics plays a big role in measurement. However, the biggest determinant is how much exercise you do. For most patients, heart conditioning is a big factor – Dr. Titano said.

He adds that the outside temperature can have a small effect on your heart rate, as well as your emotions – stress or anxiety can increase your heart rate.

– According to the American Heart Association (AHA), certain medications, including thyroid supplements, can also affect your heart rate. In addition, your heart rate may slow down with age. There are exceptions of 60 to 100 beats per minute – primarily at the lower end of the spectrum. For example, the heart rate of highly trained athletes, who are accustomed to high endurance exercise and cardio training – can usually be below 0 beats when not exercising due to their physical fitness – Dr. Titano said.

What should your heart rate be during exercise?

Obviously, your heart rate will increase when you exercise. For this healthy range, you need to know two concepts: maximum heart rate and target heart rate.

“You can find your highest heart rate by subtracting your age from 220,” said Dr. 220 Titano, but that number will remain at the highest end of your spectrum. For example, if you’re close to 30, according to the American Heart Association, your maximum heart rate will be 190 beats per minute – and if you reach that point during exercise, it’s best to take a break because you’re close to your maximum 100%.

– A good target number during exercise is your target heart rate or a certain percentage of your maximum heart rate. During moderate-intensity activity, the AHA says your target heart rate should be 50-70% of your maximum heart rate, while during vigorous physical activity it should be 70-85% of your maximum heart rate.

The cardiologist at a clinic in Cleveland, Dr. Daniel Cantillon says how regularly you are physically active affects your heart rate during exercise.

– This means that you will need more work to reach your target heart rate while continuing to exercise and conditioning your heart.

Examine the pulse with your fingers – the easiest way

So how do you calculate your heart rate – and how well can you tell?

The easiest and most accurate way to check your heart rate is the old-fashioned way – to check your heart rate with your fingers.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), there are four places in your body where you can do this: the inside of the elbow, the side of the neck, the top of the foot, or the inside of the joint. To find your number, set the phone’s timer (or any other) to one minute, and then count how many times you’ve been vibrating in those 60 seconds. When you can use a smartwatch or similar device to check your heart rate, Dr. Cantilon advises you not to rely too much on those devices, especially when you exercise.

– Some patients focus on their heartbeat while exercising, [ali] You practice a number that can be very wrong in some cases. Since some technologies can determine accuracy through heartbeat detection, it can be easier to listen to your body during exercise, Dr. Cant Cantillon said.

If at any time – during exercise or rest – you feel your heart beating very fast, it is a matter of attention.

– Many people know that their heart beats faster than normal. At that time, you should monitor your body for other symptoms such as dizziness or chest pain and seek treatment within a short time if you have any other red flags such as shortness of breath or your heart does not return to normal. Minutes but remember that you cannot notice any change in heart rate. Many patients are very sensitive to heart rate; I can feel it when it gets too much or too slow, but some people aren’t even aware that something is happening.

The heart can beat very slowly

In addition to beating too fast, your heart is beating too slowly, beating unevenly, or you may notice a break in your heartbeat. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute says it can feel like your heart is dropping. Other symptoms of any type of arrhythmia (known as any irregular heartbeat) include anxiety, fatigue, fainting, and sweating.

So, it is a smart habit to monitor your heart rate regularly to know your basic rest number and how much your heart is working during exercise. And as always, if something bothers and worries you, it’s best to consult a doctor.


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By eseek

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